Craig Harris/Macon County Times Russell Brown's Beat Bama BBQ event was held on Friday for the first time since 2009.

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

Russell Brown's Beat Bama BBQ event was held on Friday for the first time since 2009.

LAFAYETTE - Russell Brown has watched a lot of football from the north end zone of Neyland Stadium.

"There's a lot of good memories," Brown said.

Unfortunately, for Brown and the rest of the University of Tennessee fan base, Saturday's contest against rival Alabama won't be one to store away upstairs as the top-ranked Crimson Tide rolled to a 45-7 victory over Brown's beloved Volunteers.

However, Friday brought back a flood of fondness as the Lafayette attorney resumed hosting the Beat Bama BBQ event for the Lafayette community.

Friday's gathering came after an eight-year hiatus.

"I wanted to do this thing again, and it's been great," Brown said. "I didn't realize how much I missed it."

Brown - a Gainesboro native who moved to Lafayette after graduating from college in Memphis - has been an attorney in Lafayette since 1983, with his office located on the town square.

"It began in 1995, because Alabama had won 10 in a row (over Tennessee)," Brown said. "That year, we beat them 41-14. I said, 'I can't stop now,' and we did it every year until 2009. I historically did it at the square."

Friday's event was held at Key Park from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. There was approximately 400 individuals who dropped by for food, fellowship and football talk.

"This is more room," Brown said of Key Park. "I started it back because Alabama has beaten us 12 out of the last 14 years. The rivalry has historically been streaky. It may not be this year, but we're going to break this Alabama streak."

Though Brown didn't attend the University of Tennessee, he has been a life-long Volunteer fan.

"I grew up listening to Tennessee on the radio as a young boy," Brown - who has multiple family members who were UT students - said. "I loved them as a child."

Brown's family bleeds orange as well.

"My daughter (Mary Brown Cregger) would not eat red M&Ms, because she said they were Alabama color," Brown - a Tennessee football season ticket holder - said. "My children have grown up now. They are in South Carolina. They come over (for Tennessee football games)."

The first Beat Bama BBQ took place after court had ended its session on a Friday, with Brown's wife preparing barbecue for the judges and courtroom personnel. The next year, it expanded to include courthouse personnel, then grew to include various bankers and business owners in the area and steadily grew from there.

With the Volunteers holding a 3-4 overall record and an 0-4 mark in Southeastern Conference play, there's been considerable talk about whether head coach Butch Jones will soon be fired.

"Butch is a good man, but I'm afraid Butch's days are numbered," Brown said. "The rank and file Tennesseans expect to win, and we don't expect to win any more."

Regardless, Brown will continue to sit in section YY and cheer on the Vols … and he'll hold out hope that the joy that he receives from hosting his Beat Bama BBQ events soon turn into postgame celebrations following wins over the Crimson Tide.

"I'm loving this," Brown said. "I'm a people person. I'm a shake your hand and pat your back … and hug you depending on how good you look."

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

Russell Brown's Beat Bama BBQ event was held on Friday for the first time since 2009.

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

Conilla Robinson plays corn hole as her brother, Johnny Murray, looks on during Friday's Beat Bama BBQ.

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

Lafayette attorney Russell Brown hosted the Beat Bama BBQ on Friday at Key Park.

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

Russell Brown hosted his first Beat Bama BBQ event in 1995.

Craig Harris/Macon County Times

This year's Beat Bama BBQ was held at Key Park for the first time.